Recent Changes

Thursday, May 3

Monday, April 23

  1. page Braden Finch- Bob Dylan edited ... Advertising signs that con youInto thinking you're the oneThat can do what's never been doneTh…
    ...
    Advertising signs that con youInto thinking you're the oneThat can do what's never been doneThat can win what's never been wonMeantime life outside goes onAll around you.
    You loose yourself, you reappearYou suddenly find you got nothing to fearAlone you stand without nobody nearWhen a trembling distant voice, unclearStartles your sleeping ears to hearThat somebody thinksThey really found you.
    ...
    and not forget ThatforgetThat it is
    Although the masters make the rulesFor the wise men and the foolsI got nothing, Ma, to live up to.
    For them that must obey authorityThat they do not respect in any degreeWho despite their jobs, their destiniesSpeak jealously of them that are freeCultivate their flowers to beNothing more than somethingThey invest in.
    ...
    This poem also has a fairly noticeable shift in tone. In the first poem, Dylan seems to be more of a storyteller: he doesn't directly express his views through the narration, he simply narrates the strange events that are happening. While all of them are highly symbolic, they are not depicted with any subjectivity. In this poem, there is definitely an opinionated tone to the speaker, and he is not just narrating an odd story but speaking directly to his mother. The tone is one of general dissatisfaction: the speaker is fed up with the hypocrisy and lies of society, and envisions himself as a challenge and eventual martyr against it. Much of the poem seems to be challenging the conservatives of the day; not a unusual theme for musicians. The overall tone of the poem seems to be quite a bleak one as well, pointing out that this "darkness" is overcoming what people should truly value in their lives.
    The poem's opening stanza depicts an unknown form of darkness destroying the innocent peoples' lives, and that "there is no sense in trying". This intro with its desperation and hopelessness, sets the dark tone of the poem, and Dylan eventually seems to reveal that the darkness is the hypocrisy of the government, religious organizations, and various conservative movements. He goes on to remark that the main hypocritical things these institutions are doing is selling themselves out for money, such as "flesh colored Christs that glow in the dark" and "tiny toy guns that spark" in stanza 6. He then points out the key point that "Not much is really sacred", emphasizing that what these groups say they stand for is really just a facade for profit and power.
    ...
    society, as "While"
    While
    one who
    ...
    vulgarity and censorship. Thecensorship.The speaker concludes
    ...
    him executed.
    Again, the meter is consistent but not of a specific form, and the structure of the poem is similar to most songs: several stanzas comprising verses and a refrain, albeit with some slight variation. This refrain in particular stood out to me, because despite all the negativity and criticism rife within the work, the refrain actually provides a word of comfort as they speaker assures his mother (or whatever protective figure it is intended to be) that everything will be all right, and, after all, it is "life and life only."
    http://www.timsah.com/Bob-Dylan-Its-Alright-Ma-Im-Only-Bleeding/Z0TrQVD1emX

    (view changes)
    4:15 pm
  2. page Maddy Gogol- Jane Hirshfield edited ... The fence is a metaphor for life, and “the quite opening… perhaps eighteen inches” is a metaph…
    ...
    The fence is a metaphor for life, and “the quite opening… perhaps eighteen inches” is a metaphor for acceptance (Hirshfield 1-3). The deer is a symbol for all kinds of problems or disturbances that may occur in ones life. It represents how relentless problems that we may attempt to cover up or ignore can be. Just as a large buck may jump “four feet off the ground” (Hirshfield 5) in order to fit through a surprisingly small hole, problems that we attempt disregard have a way of pushing their way into our lives all at once with “no tuft of the coarse white belly hair left behind” (Hirshfield 7). The arc of water (Hirshfield 9) is the arc in which the stag jumps, so swiftly and effortlessly.
    The end of the poem surprised me. In the beginning, I assumed Hirshfield was focusing on the deer: how it knew what it wanted and took it accordingly. When I read that the speaker “[had] never felt such accurate envy” (Hirshfield 10), I immediately assumed it was for the deer. After I read further and discovered that the speaker was jealous of pourous object, I realized he or she was talking about the actual fence. This coincides perfectly with the theme of accepting disturbances and viewing them in a sumptuous way, as Hirshfield mentioned in “French Horn”. Hirshfield wants to be able to accept anything that lives throws at her with open arms. She doesn’t want to pout over experiences that she was not expecting; she wants to rejoice in this fact and embrace it.
    Maddy Gogol- Jane HirshfieldThe Supple Deer Audio
    http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/20438
    “The Supple Deer” has a tone of wonder and awe. The speaker is amazed at the ability of the fence to take in whatever comes near it, even a stag. Hirshfield chose an interesting stanza structure. The turn between the second and third stanzas shows the change from a literal event to an explanation of the deeper meaning.
    (view changes)
    6:03 am
  3. page Maddy Gogol- Jane Hirshfield edited ... The fence is a metaphor for life, and “the quite opening… perhaps eighteen inches” is a metaph…
    ...
    The fence is a metaphor for life, and “the quite opening… perhaps eighteen inches” is a metaphor for acceptance (Hirshfield 1-3). The deer is a symbol for all kinds of problems or disturbances that may occur in ones life. It represents how relentless problems that we may attempt to cover up or ignore can be. Just as a large buck may jump “four feet off the ground” (Hirshfield 5) in order to fit through a surprisingly small hole, problems that we attempt disregard have a way of pushing their way into our lives all at once with “no tuft of the coarse white belly hair left behind” (Hirshfield 7). The arc of water (Hirshfield 9) is the arc in which the stag jumps, so swiftly and effortlessly.
    The end of the poem surprised me. In the beginning, I assumed Hirshfield was focusing on the deer: how it knew what it wanted and took it accordingly. When I read that the speaker “[had] never felt such accurate envy” (Hirshfield 10), I immediately assumed it was for the deer. After I read further and discovered that the speaker was jealous of pourous object, I realized he or she was talking about the actual fence. This coincides perfectly with the theme of accepting disturbances and viewing them in a sumptuous way, as Hirshfield mentioned in “French Horn”. Hirshfield wants to be able to accept anything that lives throws at her with open arms. She doesn’t want to pout over experiences that she was not expecting; she wants to rejoice in this fact and embrace it.
    Maddy Gogol- Jane Hirshfield
    http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/20438
    “The Supple Deer” has a tone of wonder and awe. The speaker is amazed at the ability of the fence to take in whatever comes near it, even a stag. Hirshfield chose an interesting stanza structure. The turn between the second and third stanzas shows the change from a literal event to an explanation of the deeper meaning.
    (view changes)
    6:00 am
  4. page Maddy Gogol- Jane Hirshfield edited ... The fence is a metaphor for life, and “the quite opening… perhaps eighteen inches” is a metaph…
    ...
    The fence is a metaphor for life, and “the quite opening… perhaps eighteen inches” is a metaphor for acceptance (Hirshfield 1-3). The deer is a symbol for all kinds of problems or disturbances that may occur in ones life. It represents how relentless problems that we may attempt to cover up or ignore can be. Just as a large buck may jump “four feet off the ground” (Hirshfield 5) in order to fit through a surprisingly small hole, problems that we attempt disregard have a way of pushing their way into our lives all at once with “no tuft of the coarse white belly hair left behind” (Hirshfield 7). The arc of water (Hirshfield 9) is the arc in which the stag jumps, so swiftly and effortlessly.
    The end of the poem surprised me. In the beginning, I assumed Hirshfield was focusing on the deer: how it knew what it wanted and took it accordingly. When I read that the speaker “[had] never felt such accurate envy” (Hirshfield 10), I immediately assumed it was for the deer. After I read further and discovered that the speaker was jealous of pourous object, I realized he or she was talking about the actual fence. This coincides perfectly with the theme of accepting disturbances and viewing them in a sumptuous way, as Hirshfield mentioned in “French Horn”. Hirshfield wants to be able to accept anything that lives throws at her with open arms. She doesn’t want to pout over experiences that she was not expecting; she wants to rejoice in this fact and embrace it.
    http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/20438
    “The Supple Deer” has a tone of wonder and awe. The speaker is amazed at the ability of the fence to take in whatever comes near it, even a stag. Hirshfield chose an interesting stanza structure. The turn between the second and third stanzas shows the change from a literal event to an explanation of the deeper meaning.
    {Hole-in-Chain-Link-Fence.jpg}
    (view changes)
    6:00 am

Thursday, April 19

Wednesday, April 18

  1. page Megan Guenther- Kay Ryan edited ... with mitts for hands whom God protects. Poetry Foundation Reading In her poem, “Flamingo …
    ...
    with mitts for hands
    whom God protects.
    Poetry Foundation Reading
    In her poem, “Flamingo Watching”, Ryan investigates the topic of standing out versus blending in. She uses the flamingo, a very bright, strange bird with some awkward tendencies, as her symbol of something that truly stands out. She goes into great detail when describing the bird, analyzing all of its characteristics, actions, and mannerisms. In this description, Ryan uses specific diction to emphasize the unique and awkward traits of the flamingo. Words like “vivid”, “peculiar”, “flexible”, “sinuous”, and “flamboyant” all contribute to the imagery of the strange animal that Ryan is trying to portray.
    She begins the poem by saying that the flamingo brings “a city’s worth/ of furbelows” with her, wherever she goes. I did not know what a furbelow was at first, so I looked it up. Dictionary.com defines furbelow as “a ruffle or flounce; any bit of showy trimming”. Ryan uses the exaggeration of “a city’s worth” to convey the excessive showiness of the flamingo’s appearance. However, Ryan does not imply that this extravagant look is necessarily a good thing. She says the bird must bring it with her wherever she goes, which seems to insinuate that it is more of a burden than a blessing. She goes on to describe the same bird as “unnatural by nature” and “too vivid and peculiar/ a structure to be pretty”, which confirms the idea that the flamingo’s vibrant dress is not a positive trait. Next, Ryan uses the metaphor of a performer to describe the flamingo, saying that “anything she does/ seems like an act” and she cannot “convince an audience/ she’s serious”. I think this act metaphor further emphasizes the awkwardness that the flamingo represents because its appearance traps it in a permanent spotlight of sorts. From a grammatical and structural viewpoint, Ryan uses free verse throughout the majority of the poem, and does not coordinate the line breaks with the end of sentences. This style give the poem a more casual and conversational tone, because there is no real rhythm.
    (view changes)
    5:57 pm

Friday, April 13

  1. page Bonnie Tynes- Billy Collins edited ... and that they themselves are Mr. Sillypants. Start Analysis. ... large stanzas. Collin…
    ...
    and that they themselves are Mr. Sillypants.
    Start Analysis.
    ...
    large stanzas.
    Collins starts his poem in the first stanza with a comparison of two very different things. Dating all the way back to "prehistoric times" the poem begins at the what marks the beginning of human existence. Rather than referencing the typical idea of human evolution though, Collins chooses to use "prehistoric fish" to be the first human being types to walk this world. His casual, almost sardonic tone in the way references how the fish "sauntered off the beaches into forests" sets the tone for the remainder of the poem. He names the first human language utterances "some irregular verbs for their first conversation," so we now are thinking speaking, language, the beginning, innocence, etc. This is then compared to "three-year-old children entering the phase of name-calling," the comparison point being that this act of name-calling comes natural at a young age. This sets the stage for the rest of the poem.
    The second stanza opens with the idea that every new day is a new opportunity for a new name to call someone as a little kid. Day by day small children listen to others and then choose to copy what they hear the next chance they get. "You Dumb Goopyhead, You Big Sewerface, You Poop-on-the-Floor," all insults and names that Collins clearly has either heard or used at one point in his life. A prime example of his usage of humor in poetry. The next line says, "they yell from knee level, their little mugs flushed with challenge," mugs being another word for faces. We now have an image of these young children yelling these insults and names and meaning what they're saying by the looks of concentration and severity on their faces. The next line in this stanza reads, "Nothing Samuel Johnson would bother tossing out in a pub"-- Samuel Johnson was an English author and poet born in 1709. He published "A Dictionary of the English Language," making many significant contributions to Modern English. That being said, Collins is saying that these little toddlers and the names they are choosing to call others are words so bizarre that even a man who wrote a dictionary couldn't come up with them. Collins then refers to Samuel Johnson as a "fatuous Enlightment hack", fatuous meaning silly or pointless, so he is now insulting the man he just referenced in the previous line.
    The third stanza begins casually. Collins refers to the adults that the toddlers are looking up at as "giants way up there with their cocktails and bad breath talking baritone nonsense to other giants". SO we can now notice this theme of Collins writing a poem about name-calling while constantly using insults and a different method of name-calling himself throughout the poem. He then switches the focus from the toddlers name-calling methods to the methods of the adults way up above. He says that the giants, "wait to call them names after thanking them for the lovely party and hearing the door close." The truth here is undeniable. Kids never really grow up. Oftentimes even adults are more immature in their methods of judgment and insults, as depicted here through Collins' example of grown-ups' behaviors.
    ...
    others names.
    The title of the poem is "Child Development". Children never really stop being children it seems, irony within the title even. {kids.jpg} an example of name-calling among children
    (view changes)
    7:34 am
  2. page Bonnie Tynes- Billy Collins edited ... flushed with challenge. Nothing Samuel Johnson would bother tossing out ... not trying …
    ...
    flushed with challenge.
    Nothing Samuel Johnson would bother tossing out
    ...
    not trying
    to devastate some fatuous Enlightenment hack.
    They are just tormenting their fellow squirts (15)
    ...
    their wives are Dopey Dopeheads
    and that they themselves are Mr. Sillypants.
    Start Analysis.
    As mentioned previously, Billy Collins is the master of implementing humor in a variety of ways to his poems. Oftentimes the humor is subtle, or even a more undetectable sarcasm, but here humor is the mold around which this poem, "Child Development"'s, subject is shaped. His diction is most identifiable through his use of made-up words that serve as insults and moreover the most unique part of this poem as a whole. This poem is written in free-verse, as usual, and it is separated into four rather large stanzas.
    Collins starts his poem in the first stanza with a comparison of two very different things. Dating all the way back to "prehistoric times" the poem begins at the what marks the beginning of human existence. Rather than referencing the typical idea of human evolution though, Collins chooses to use "prehistoric fish" to be the first human being types to walk this world. His casual, almost sardonic tone in the way references how the fish "sauntered off the beaches into forests" sets the tone for the remainder of the poem. He names the first human language utterances "some irregular verbs for their first conversation," so we now are thinking speaking, language, the beginning, innocence, etc. This is then compared to "three-year-old children entering the phase of name-calling," the comparison point being that this act of name-calling comes natural at a young age. This sets the stage for the rest of the poem.
    The second stanza opens with the idea that every new day is a new opportunity for a new name to call someone as a little kid. Day by day small children listen to others and then choose to copy what they hear the next chance they get. "You Dumb Goopyhead, You Big Sewerface, You Poop-on-the-Floor," all insults and names that Collins clearly has either heard or used at one point in his life. A prime example of his usage of humor in poetry. The next line says, "they yell from knee level, their little mugs flushed with challenge," mugs being another word for faces. We now have an image of these young children yelling these insults and names and meaning what they're saying by the looks of concentration and severity on their faces. The next line in this stanza reads, "Nothing Samuel Johnson would bother tossing out in a pub"-- Samuel Johnson was an English author and poet born in 1709. He published "A Dictionary of the English Language," making many significant contributions to Modern English. That being said, Collins is saying that these little toddlers and the names they are choosing to call others are words so bizarre that even a man who wrote a dictionary couldn't come up with them. Collins then refers to Samuel Johnson as a "fatuous Enlightment hack", fatuous meaning silly or pointless, so he is now insulting the man he just referenced in the previous line.
    The third stanza begins casually. Collins refers to the adults that the toddlers are looking up at as "giants way up there with their cocktails and bad breath talking baritone nonsense to other giants". SO we can now notice this theme of Collins writing a poem about name-calling while constantly using insults and a different method of name-calling himself throughout the poem. He then switches the focus from the toddlers name-calling methods to the methods of the adults way up above. He says that the giants, "wait to call them names after thanking them for the lovely party and hearing the door close." The truth here is undeniable. Kids never really grow up. Oftentimes even adults are more immature in their methods of judgment and insults, as depicted here through Collins' example of grown-ups' behaviors.
    Fourth stanza introduces heavy sarcasm. Collins says that, "the mature save their hothead invective (insulting) for things". He then lists a few example of things that these "mature" adults put forth their invective on. All of the examples seem random and very ordinary, things, but they all share one thing in common- They are boring and they are all things that either lack any substance whatsoever or they're something that would seriously annoy someone--"receding trains missed by seconds". Halfway through this final stanza comes the irony. "Though they know in their adult hearts even as they threaten to banish Timmy to bed for his appalling behavior, that their bosses are Big Fatty Stupids, their wives are Dopey Dopeheads, and that they themselves are Mr. Sillypants." Humor, sarcasm, and irony ends the poem the same way it started. With insults made up by Collins himself, and undeniable similarity between the way toddlers call others names and the way adults think and wish they could call others names.
    The title of the poem is "Child Development". Children never really stop being children it seems, irony within the title even. {kids.jpg} an example of name-calling among children

    (view changes)
    7:33 am
  3. file kids.jpg uploaded
    7:32 am

More